TITLE 43. TRANSPORTATION

PART 10. TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES

CHAPTER 211. CRIMINAL HISTORY OFFENSE AND ACTION ON LICENSE

SUBCHAPTER A. CRIMINAL OFFENSE AND ACTION ON LICENSE

43 TAC §211.6

INTRODUCTION. The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (department) adopts new 43 TAC §211.6, concerning fingerprint requirements for licensing applicants for and holders of a general distinguishing number (GDN) under Transportation Code Chapter 503 for all dealer types listed in Transportation Code §503.029(a)(6). The department adopts §211.6 without changes to the proposed text as published in the April 22, 2022, issue of the Texas Register (47 TexReg 2122). The rule will not be republished.

REASONED JUSTIFICATION. New §211.6 is necessary to prevent fraud in the application process by verifying an applicant's identity, as well as the identity of the applicant's representatives who are required to be listed in the application, through submitted fingerprints. Section 211.6 is also necessary to obtain a complete and comprehensive Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) criminal background check. The department must obtain a complete DPS and FBI criminal history record of the applicant, as well as its representatives who are required to be listed in the application, and check for possible affiliation with any other individual or business entity previously deemed unfit to hold a license, to properly administer Transportation Code §503.034, Occupations Code §53.021 and §2301.651, and 43 TAC §211.3. On renewal or amendment of a license, the department must obtain the complete DPS and FBI criminal history of the license holder, as well as its representatives who are listed in the application, to properly administer Transportation Code §503.038, Occupations Code §53.021 and §2301.651, and §211.3. The department currently has access, via a name-based search, to the criminal history record information that DPS maintains. However, criminals can circumvent the name-based background check by using false or stolen identities. A fingerprint-based background check significantly increases the likelihood that the department can verify the identity of the applicant, as well as the applicant's representatives who are included in the license application. The fingerprints would be collected through a service that requires the individual to show up in person and present identification which must be validated prior to having their fingerprints collected electronically.

Licenses issued by the department create positions of trust. Abuse of this trust provides license holders opportunities to engage in fraud, theft, money laundering and related crimes. Recently, bad actor license holders have taken advantage of their licenses by printing fraudulent temporary tags, which enable criminals to operate stolen vehicles, facilitating crimes such as human and drug trafficking. Criminals use fraudulently obtained temporary tags that are registered under fake names and addresses to make it harder for law enforcement to trace the vehicles. Fraudulent temporary tags are also used to operate motor vehicles that violate environmental and safety regulations, thus endangering the public.

Section 211.6 is also designed to protect the public even when a fraudulent temporary tag is not at issue. Holders of a GDN license for all dealer types under Transportation Code §503.029(a)(6), as well as their representatives, provide services that involve access to confidential information, conveyance, titling, and registration of private property. Further, license holders and their representatives obtain possession of monies belonging to or owed to private individuals, creditors, and governmental entities. In addition, licensure provides persons who are predisposed to commit assaultive or sexual crimes with greater opportunities to engage in such conduct. Lastly, license holders and their representatives must comply with federal and state environmental and safety regulations.

The fingerprint-based background check will be used to evaluate the criminal history of the applicant, as well as the applicant's representatives who are required to be listed on the department's licensing application, under the department's criminal offense guidelines in §211.3 under Occupations Code §53.021. The DPS criminal history record information is limited to crimes committed in Texas. The FBI criminal history record information includes crimes committed in other states, as well as federal crimes. Human and drug trafficking crimes are commonly prosecuted on a federal level. Also, the FBI fingerprint-based criminal history background check enables the department to obtain the FBI "Rap Back" subscription service, which notifies the department when a person's criminal history record has changed. DPS also provides a "Rap Back" service, which requires fingerprints. The department intends to use information from the FBI and DPS Rap Back services to determine if an associated license should be revoked or not renewed as authorized under applicable statutes and department rules.

New §211.6(a) is added to state that the fingerprint requirements apply to applicants for and holders of a franchised or independent dealer GDN. These license holders and their representatives provide services that involve access to confidential information, conveyance, titling, and registration of private property. Further, license holders and their representatives obtain possession of monies belonging to or owed to private individuals, creditors, and governmental entities. In addition, licensure provides persons who are predisposed to commit assaultive or sexual crimes with greater opportunities to engage in such conduct. Lastly, license holders and their representatives must comply with federal and state environmental and safety regulations.

When the department adopted current Chapter 211, it determined which offenses directly relate to the duties and responsibilities of license holders and their representatives, either because the offense entails a violation of the public trust; issuance of a license would provide an opportunity to engage in further criminal activity of the same type; or the offense demonstrates the person's inability to act with honesty, trustworthiness, and integrity. Such offenses include crimes under the laws of another state and the United States. In proposing new §211.6, the department determined that requiring a biometric identifier to verify identity and obtain a comprehensive DPS and FBI criminal history record for applicants for and holders of licenses, along with their representatives, will prevent individuals with disqualifying criminal histories from being licensed or renewing their licenses, thus substantially decreasing fraud and providing enhanced protection for citizens of Texas.

New §211.6(b) requires all persons applying for a new license, license amendment due to change in ownership, or license renewal, to submit a complete and acceptable set of fingerprints to DPS and pay required fees for the purpose of obtaining criminal history record information from DPS and the FBI.

New §211.6(c) requires that persons who are acting at the time of application, or will later act, in a representative capacity for an applicant or holder of a license, including the applicant's or holder's officers, directors, members, managers, trustees, partners, principals, or managers of business affairs, must also submit a complete and acceptable set of fingerprints and pay fees to DPS as described by §211.6(b). New §211.6(c) is consistent with §211.2(a)(2) of this chapter because it lists the same representatives for an applicant or holder of a license.

Occupations Code §2301.651(b) gives the board authority to deny an application for a license or take other action against an applicant or "license holder" for an act or omission by an officer, director, partner, trustee, or other person acting in a representative capacity for an applicant or "license holder" that would be cause for denying a license under Chapter 2301. Occupations Code §2301.002(18) defines "license holder" as a person who holds a license or GDN issued under Chapter 2301 or Transportation Code Chapter 503. Occupations Code §2301.651(a) includes bases for which the department may deny an application for a license or revoke or suspend a license, including when the applicant or license holder is unfit under standards described in Chapter 2301 or the board's rules. The fingerprint-based background check will be used to evaluate the criminal history of the applicant, as well as the applicant's representatives who are required to be listed on the department's licensing application, under the department's criminal offense guidelines in §211.3.

Taken together, Occupations Code §2301.651(b), related definitions in §2301.002, and §§2301.251, 2301.255, and 2301.257 provide authority for the department to require applicants to list in the GDN application any individual authorized to act as a representative. Without this information the department could not carry out its statutory responsibility under Chapter 2301 to investigate whether a representative committed a disqualifying act or omission that would prevent the applicant from being licensed as a GDN dealer.

SUMMARY OF COMMENTS.

The department received four written comments in support of the proposed new rule from the Smith County District Attorney's Office, the Dublin Police Department and two individual commenters. The department received four written comments requesting one or more changes in the rule text from the Vidor Police Department, the Fort Bend County Precinct 3 Constable's Office, the Texas Automobile Dealers Association, and an individual commenter.

Comment:

A commenter expressed support for the proposed rule stating that the rule is another positive step in the right direction to restore integrity of the system.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the support and agrees with the commenter that implementing fingerprinting for GDN dealers will substantially reduce identity fraud in the dealer application process and enable the department to more effectively screen dealer applicants based on criminal history. Also, the department must obtain fingerprints to subscribe to the DPS and FBI Rap Back services to obtain any new criminal history record information on current GDN holders and their representatives to determine whether to revoke, renew, or amend an existing GDN under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3 and Occupations Code §53.021.

Comment:

A commenter expressed support for the rule and is looking forward to further measures the department will take to fight fraud and other crimes. The commenter noted that this rule addresses public safety concerns and that the department has a duty to screen individuals who are collecting and using citizen's personal identifying information.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the support and has several other initiatives underway to reduce fraud and support law enforcement. The department agrees with the commenter that this rule addresses important public safety concerns and that the department has an important responsibility to effectively screen dealer applicants and not license known bad actors who could continue to commit fraud and other crimes. Also, the department must obtain fingerprints to subscribe to the DPS and FBI Rap Back services to obtain any new criminal history record information on current GDN holders and their representatives to determine whether to revoke, renew, or amend an existing GDN under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3 and Occupations Code §53.021.

Comment:

A commenter supports the new rule noting that an incredible amount of crime has been perpetrated using fraudulent Texas paper tags and endorses all other efforts the department undertakes to prevent the mass issuance of fraudulent paper tags.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the support. As of June 27, 2022, 75 dealers have been denied access to the temporary tag system used to print paper tags since the department's rule authorizing denial of access (43 TAC §215.505) became effective on January 27, 2022. One of the dealers who has been denied access under §215.505 used a stolen identity to obtain a license from the department. Department staff continue to closely monitor dealer temporary tag usage. Feedback from the law enforcement community is that these efforts have already made a significant difference and that fingerprinting is a crucial next step to prevent bad actors from being licensed.

Comment:

A commenter supports fingerprinting of individuals involved in operating a car dealership and encouraged adoption of the rule.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the support and agrees that this rule will provide increased protection to Texas citizens.

Comment:

Two commenters recommended that all persons who access the temporary tag system be fingerprinted.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the comment. Texas Government Code §411.122 allows the department to access criminal history record information only for persons who are applicants or current license holders. So, while owners and certain authorized representatives who have temporary tag system access will be fingerprinted under this rule, the department may not require fingerprints for all persons to whom a dealer may grant temporary tag system access under the dealer's account. Dealers are responsible for managing account access and use and are required to limit authorized users to owners and bona fide employees with a business need to access the database under 43 TAC §215.150. Also, comments on modifying the department's rules regarding the temporary tag database are welcome, but are outside the scope of §211.6.

Comment:

A commenter suggested that all affected persons be fingerprinted immediately, rather than waiting until the existing GDN holders apply to renew their license.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the comment and shares the commenter's sense of urgency to implement the fingerprint rule. The rule requires all new applicants to be fingerprinted before a license can be issued. Section 211.6 also requires current license holders to be fingerprinted at their next license renewal date which will occur during one of the next 24 months. Over 20,150 current license holders are affected by this rule. Requiring immediate fingerprinting for all current license holders would place a severe burden on license holders, the department, and DPS's vendor that provides identity verification and fingerprinting services. Further, this change would delay implementation of this rule, including the requirement for all new applicants to be fingerprinted. For these reasons, the department will not make this suggested change.

Comment:

A commenter suggested that two-factor authentication should be required to log in to the temporary tag database to prevent unauthorized users from accessing the system.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the comment and agrees that system security enhancements such as two-factor authentication or multi-factor authentication are helpful in preventing unauthorized system access. The department's Information Technology Services Division is currently evaluating these tools and plans to implement solutions such as these across multiple department systems. Comments on improving temporary tag-related system security are welcome but are outside the scope of §211.6.

Comment:

A commenter suggested adding a new subsection to the rule exempting a person who has been fingerprinted by another Texas agency as the identity of the licensee has previously been vetted. The commenter gave the following examples of a license holder with a set of fingerprints on file with DPS: a license to carry a handgun, a license with the Texas Department of Insurance, and a license regarding motor vehicle sales financing. The commenter also stated that if it was necessary, such license holder must give the department written authorization so the person's fingerprints are subject to the DPS Rap Back subscription service, so the department can obtain criminal history record updates. The commenter further suggested that the department use electronically readable information from a driver's license, commercial driver's license, or personal identification certificate as an alternative means of establishing a licensee's or applicant's identity. Lastly, the commenter stated that the newly adopted rules regarding temporary tags should be given time to gauge whether there is a need to impose new and additional regulatory demands on licensees.

Agency Response:

The department appreciates the comment. The commenter focused on the department's statement that the purpose of §211.6 is to verify the identity of the applicant. However, the department also stated that the purpose of §211.6 is to provide the department with the applicant's fingerprints so the department can obtain a complete and comprehensive DPS and FBI criminal background check to evaluate the applicant's criminal history under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3.

Section 211.3 authorizes the department to deny an application for a license, as well as to revoke the license of an existing licensee. The department must obtain the complete DPS and FBI criminal history record of the applicant, as well as its representatives who are listed in the application, and check for possible affiliation with any other individual or business entity previously deemed unfit to hold a license, to properly administer Transportation Code §503.034, Occupations Code §53.021 and §2301.651, and §211.3. The department must also obtain fingerprints to subscribe to the DPS and FBI Rap Back services to obtain any new criminal history record information on current GDN holders and their representatives to determine whether to revoke an existing GDN under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3 and Occupations Code §53.021.

DPS interprets Government Code §411.087(d)(1) to require the department to provide fingerprints for applicants and license holders as a prerequisite to receiving criminal history record information from the system containing DPS and FBI fingerprint-based criminal history records. A state agency that receives criminal history record information from DPS is not authorized to share that criminal history record information with another state agency. The department must obtain the criminal history record information on the applicant and the people who are listed in the applicant's application to determine whether the application must be denied under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3. Even though another Texas state agency issued a license to an applicant after obtaining the applicant's fingerprint-based criminal history record information, the department might reject an application from the same applicant under the department's criminal offense guidelines under §211.3. Different Texas state agencies have different criminal offense guidelines, which are customized for each state agency using the criteria under Occupations Code §53.021. Section 53.021(a) includes an offense that directly relates to the duties and responsibilities of the licensed occupation.

Even if DPS authorized the department to obtain criminal history record information under §411.087(d)(1) based on fingerprints on file for another Texas state agency, the department would choose to have applicants and license holders provide fingerprints as part of an application for a GDN under §211.6. Otherwise, an applicant for a GDN could impersonate someone else if they knew the person has fingerprints on file with DPS. For example, if the applicant knows someone who has a license to carry a handgun, the applicant could impersonate this person when applying for a GDN from the department.

The department agrees that the use of electronically readable information from a driver's license, commercial driver's license, or personal identification certificate is a valuable tool to establish a license holder's or applicant's identity, and this method is used by DPS's vendor to confirm identity. However, it is not an alternative to fingerprinting as the department must also obtain the complete DPS and FBI criminal history record information on any applicant and license holder, as well as its representatives who are listed in the application. While not all dealer categories have been associated with temporary tag fraud, the department's existing background check process has found applicants in all dealer categories that have been convicted of other forms of fraud and serious crimes including forgery, making a false statement, tampering with a government record, theft, aggravated assault, and delivery of a controlled substance. A fingerprint requirement is warranted for all dealers and will provide increased protection for the citizens of Texas. For these reasons, the department will not make these suggested changes.

The commenter focused on the fraudulent issuance of temporary tags and stated that the department's newly implemented rules regarding temporary tags should be given time to gauge whether there is a need to impose new and additional regulatory demands on licensees. As previously stated in this adoption order, the purpose of §211.6 is not limited to combatting temporary tag fraud. The department must implement §211.6 as soon as possible to protect the public. Section 211.6(b) was designed to lessen the burden on GDN applicants by only requiring the submission of fingerprints once for an active license.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY. The department adopts new §211.6 under Occupations Code §2301.155; and Transportation Code §503.002 and §1002.001.

Occupations Code §2301.155 authorizes the board to adopt rules as necessary or convenient to administer Occupations Code Chapter 2301 and to govern practice and procedure before the board.

Transportation Code §503.002 authorizes the board to adopt rules for the administration of Transportation Code Chapter 503.

Transportation Code §1002.001, authorizes the board to adopt rules that are necessary and appropriate to implement the powers and the duties of the department.

CROSS REFERENCE TO STATUTE. Occupations Code §2301.651; Transportation Code §503.034 and §503.038; and Government Code §§411.084, 411.087 and 411.122.

The agency certifies that legal counsel has reviewed the adoption and found it to be a valid exercise of the agency's legal authority.

Filed with the Office of the Secretary of State on June 30, 2022

TRD-202202455

Elizabeth Brown Fore

General Counsel

Texas Department of Motor Vehicles

Effective date: September 1, 2022

Proposal publication date: April 11, 2022

For further information, please call: (512) 465-5665


CHAPTER 215. MOTOR VEHICLE DISTRIBUTION

SUBCHAPTER G. WARRANTY PERFORMANCE OBLIGATIONS

43 TAC §215.207

INTRODUCTION. The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles adopts amendments to 43 TAC §215.207 concerning final orders for contested cases. These amendments are necessary to implement amended Occupations Code §2301.713, concerning motions for rehearing on contested cases involving vehicle warranties, and to more closely conform the rule language with Occupations Code §2301.711. The department adopts §215.207 without changes to the proposed text as published in the April 29, 2022, issue of the Texas Register (47 TexReg 2498). The rule will not be republished.

REASONED JUSTIFICATION. House Bill 3514, 87th Legislature, Regular Session (2021) amended Occupations Code §2301.713, regarding motions for rehearing on contested cases that arise under Occupations Code §2301.204 or Subchapter M of Chapter 2301. The amendments authorize the chief hearings examiner to designate a person to decide the motions for rehearing. Under Occupations Code §2301.711, any of the department's hearings examiners are authorized to sign final orders in these matters. Existing rule language only authorizes the chief hearing's examiner to respond to motions for rehearing and sign subsequent final orders. The amendments to §215.207 implement this new delegation authority and eliminate any potential, inadvertent conflict between the statute and the department's rule.

The amendment to subsection (a) clarifies that the final order that is the subject of the motion for rehearing may be issued by the board or a delegated person, in accordance with Occupations Code §2301.711.

The amendment to subsection (b) clarifies that the final order may be prepared and signed by any of the department's hearings examiners, in accordance with Occupations Code §2301.104 and §2301.711.

The amendment to paragraph (c)(1) implements the amendments to Occupations Code §2301.713 by removing language that only authorizes the chief hearings examiner to decide motions for rehearing.

An amendment to subsection (e) implements the amendments to Occupations Code §2301.713 by adding language that allows for the chief hearings examiner's designee to rule on a motion for rehearing. Subsection (e) is also amended to remove a limitation that only the chief hearings examiner can sign a new final order granting the relief requested in the motion for rehearing, to avoid any conflict and to more closely conform with the authority under Occupations Code §2301.711.

An amendment to subsection (f) removes language that is duplicative of Occupations Code §2301.751 and §2301.752 to avoid any inadvertent conflicts with those sections. Occupations Code §2301.751 addresses the courts in which a party may seek judicial review of an action; Occupations Code §2301.752 addresses the deadline for filing a petition for judicial review. An amendment also clarifies that the petition is a petition for judicial review.

SUMMARY OF COMMENTS. No comments on the proposed amendments were received.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY. The department adopts amendments to §215.207 under Occupations Code §2301.713 and Transportation Code §1002.001.

Occupations Code §2301.713 authorizes the department to adopt rules to establish procedures for motions for rehearing under Occupations Code §2301.204 or Subchapter M of Chapter 2301.

Transportation Code §1002.001 authorizes the board to adopt rules that are necessary and appropriate to implement the powers and the duties of the department.

CROSS REFERENCE TO STATUTE. Occupations Code §2301.711 and §2301.713.

The agency certifies that legal counsel has reviewed the adoption and found it to be a valid exercise of the agency's legal authority.

Filed with the Office of the Secretary of State on June 30, 2022.

TRD-202202456

Elizabeth Brown Fore

General Counsel

Texas Department of Motor Vehicles

Effective date: July 20, 2022

Proposal publication date: April 29, 2022

For further information, please call: (512) 465-5665


SUBCHAPTER J. ADMINISTRATIVE SANCTIONS

43 TAC §215.505

INTRODUCTION. The Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (department) adopts amendments to 43 TAC §215.505 concerning denial of access to the temporary tag system. The amendments to §215.505 are necessary to clarify the rule text. The department adopts §215.505 without changes to the proposed text as published in the April 29, 2022, issue of the Texas Register (47 TexReg 2499). The rule will not be republished.

REASONED JUSTIFICATION. The amendments to §215.505 are necessary to correct a statutory citation regarding the department's temporary buyer's tag database under Transportation Code §503.0631, to add parentheses around text in §215.505(a)(2) that explains when a vehicle is presumed to not be in the dealer's or converter's inventory, and to change the word "and" to "or" in §215.505(a)(2) in the list of activities that constitute "fraudulently obtained temporary tags from the temporary tag database" under §215.505. Section 215.505 contains the process for denial of access to the temporary tag database under Transportation Code §503.0632(f) when the department determines that a dealer or converter is fraudulently obtaining temporary tags from the temporary tag database.

The department adopted these same amendments through an emergency rule with an immediate effective date of April 14, 2022, as published in the Emergency Rules section of the April 29, 2022, issue of the Texas Register (47 TexReg 2387). However, emergency rules adopted under Government Code §2001.034 may not be effective for longer than 120 days and may not be renewed for longer than 60 days. The purpose of this adoption order is to make the amendments to §215.505 permanent. Government Code §2001.034 authorizes a state agency to adopt a rule that is identical to the emergency rule under Government Code §2001.023 and §2001.029.

These amendments are necessary because a subset of dealers will fraudulently obtain temporary tags from the temporary tag database without clarification of the rule text. Fraudulently obtained temporary tags pose a threat to the public health, safety, and welfare because a subset of dealers has fraudulently obtained and sold temporary tags to persons who engage in violent criminal activity, including armed robbery, human trafficking, and assaults on law enforcement. Criminals use fraudulently obtained temporary tags that are registered under fake names and addresses to make it harder for law enforcement to trace the vehicles. Fraudulently obtained temporary tags also pose a threat to the public health, safety, and welfare because a subset of dealers has fraudulently obtained and sold temporary tags to persons who operate uninsured and uninspected vehicles that are hazards to Texas motorists and the environment. Fraudulently obtained temporary tags further pose a threat to the public health, safety, and welfare because criminals can attempt to sell stolen vehicles or unsafe salvage vehicles to unsuspecting buyers by using temporary tags to make the vehicles appear legitimate. Criminals have fraudulently obtained temporary tags from the department's system and used the temporary tags in Texas, as well as other states, such as New York and Nevada. In addition, the use of fraudulently obtained temporary tags could deprive the state of revenue. Criminals will take advantage of any loopholes they see as available to them.

An amendment to §215.505(a) corrects a statutory citation regarding the department's buyer's temporary tag database under Transportation Code §503.0631, which governs the buyer's temporary tag database. Section 215.505(a) cites to Transportation Code §503.06321, which does not exist. Section 215.505 applies to the dealer's and converter's temporary tag database under Transportation Code §503.0626, as well as the buyer's temporary tag database under Transportation Code §503.0631. Amendments to §215.505(a)(2) add parentheses around text that explains when a vehicle is presumed to not be in the dealer's or converter's inventory. The parentheses were included when §215.505(a)(2) was published for proposal in the November 12, 2021, issue of the Texas Register (46 TexReg 7752); however, they were inadvertently omitted in the adoption order that was published in the February 11, 2022, issue of the Texas Register (47 TexReg 662). Another amendment to §215.505(a)(2) changes the word "and" to "or" in the list of activities that constitute "fraudulently obtained temporary tags from the temporary tag database" under §215.505. Together, these clarifying amendments will close any perceived loopholes that criminals might otherwise try to exploit.

SUMMARY OF COMMENTS.

No comments on the proposed amendments were received.

STATUTORY AUTHORITY. The department adopts amendments to §215.505 under Transportation Code §§503.002, 503.0626, 503.0631, and 1002.001.

Transportation Code §503.002 authorizes the department to adopt rules to administer Transportation Code Chapter 503.

Transportation Code §503.0626(d) authorizes the department to adopt rules and prescribe procedures as necessary to implement §503.0626.

Transportation Code §503.0631(e) authorizes the department to adopt rules and prescribe procedures as necessary to implement §503.0631.

Transportation Code §1002.001 authorizes the board to adopt rules that are necessary and appropriate to implement the powers and the duties of the department.

CROSS REFERENCE TO STATUTE. Transportation Code §§503.0626, 503.0631, 503.0632, and 503.067.

The agency certifies that legal counsel has reviewed the adoption and found it to be a valid exercise of the agency's legal authority.

Filed with the Office of the Secretary of State on July 1, 2022.

TRD-202202471

Elizabeth Brown Fore

General Counsel

Texas Department of Motor Vehicles

Effective date: July 21, 2022

Proposal publication date: April 29, 2022

For further information, please call: (512) 465-5665